Matthew Kelly / Supercall

Entertaining
Easy 2-Ingredient Cocktails to Make with Not-So-Craft Beer

By

“I’m a Budweiser, guy,” you say to yourself. “Maybe Bud Light if I’m feeling bloated—but that’s it.” There’s no room for cocktails in your life, no place for fancy glassware and no way you’ll ever drink anything classified as an “amaro.” But if you grew up in France, you’d think differently. In fact, that amaro you’re so averse to would be a part of your identity—something that told the world you’re a tough guy, especially when mixed with beer to make a (gasp!) cocktail.

The Picon Bière is a simple mix of draught beer and Amer Picon (a bitter French aperitif made with oranges, gentian and cinchona), that’s served in French cafes which usually double as bars. “That was a blue collar drink when I was growing up,” says Marie Tribouilloy, co-owner of Brooklyn’s Ops where she serves a take on the drink comprised of CioCiaro Amaro poured into a bottle of Budweiser. “It’s an easy way to get drunk. My friends used to drink it when they wanted to be more masculine. It’s funny for me to make it here where amaro is more elevated and subtle and feminine, and then to put it into Bud, the King of Beers.”

The resulting two-ingredient cocktail is far greater than the sum of its parts. The bitter, citrusy spirit transforms the bready Bud into a deeply drinkable (and extra boozy) cherry cola-esque sipper. It’s sophisticated yet easy, everyday but different. And because it’s mixed directly in the bottle, it requires zero dish washing or effort. All you have to do is take a big swig out of the beer, pour in the amaro and let the carbonation do the mixing for you. And it’s not the only way to use less-than-craft beer in a simple but spectacular cocktail. Here, the recipe for Ops’s Budweiser Amaro, along with two other two-ingredient beer-tails that can be made right in the bottle.

Matthew Kelly / Supercall
In place of the traditional Amer Picon, which is nearly impossible to find stateside, the bartenders at Ops use CioCiaro Amaro in this take on a Picon Bière. CioCiaro’s bitter orange notes and viscosity are similar to Amer Picon. “It’s a good way to introduce amaros to Budweiser drinkers,” says Tribouilloy. It would also work vice versa, should you want to get your snooty amaro-drinking friends in on the simple joys of a just-cracked Bud.

The Essentials

beer
amaro
Matthew Kelly / Supercall
Claire Sprouse, bar director of Sunday In Brooklyn, came up with this brilliantly simple spin on a Shandy. Made with Lo-Fi Aperitifs’ hibiscus-, grapefruit- and ginger-flavored amaro, along with a bottle of every bartender’s favorite beer, Miller High Life, it is shockingly delicious. Stained pink by the amaro, the beer becomes bright and fruity, like an easy-drinking citrus soda. Just one sip will have beer drinkers seeking out amaro and cocktailians heading to the corner store to pick up a six-pack of brewskies.  

The Essentials

beer
Amaro
Matthew Kelly / Supercall
Like a crisp breath of fresh fall air, this spiced beer-tail is the perfect tailgating tipple. Made with artichoke-based Cynar (don’t worry, it doesn’t actually taste like artichokes) and toasty Coors Banquet, it’s remarkably tasty and complex for a two-ingredient drink. Cynar’s notes of baking spices come forward, using the yeasty beer as a base. The result is cozy but crisp, and terrifically easy drinking.

The Essentials

beer
Cynar

Published on

More From Around The Web