Matthew Kelly / Supercall

How To Drink a Sake Bomb

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Right up there with all-you-can-eat sushi, California Rolls and pink-hued slices of ginger, the Sake Bomb is a treasured staple of Americanized Japanese restaurants. Though no one knows for sure who first thought to plunge a shot of cheap sake into a tall glass of even cheaper beer, some say it was invented by United States soldiers occupying Japan following World War II. Whatever the case, we do know for certain that there’s something wonderfully satisfying about pounding on a table and watching as the aftershocks cause shot after shot of sake to kerplunk into a circle of Sapporos. While we would never recommend Sake Bombing anywhere that doesn’t clearly offer the shot and beer deal on the menu, we do recommend trying it at least once—the right way. Here’s how to properly do a Sake Bomb.

Tools:
Chopsticks, preferably a pair that’s flat on two sides
Pint glass
Shot glass

Ingredients:
Japanese beer, like Sapporo
Sake (we like ours cold but feel free to use hot sake if that’s your thing)

Step One

Fill the shot glass with sake and fill the pint with beer, leaving enough room for the sake so the glass doesn’t overflow—unless you’re willing to clean up the mess.

Matthew Kelly / Supercall

Step Two

Place the chopsticks along the top of the pint glass, close enough together that they support the shot glass. Carefully balance the shot glass on top of the chopsticks.

Matthew Kelly / Supercall

Step Three

When you’re ready to drink, pound the table next to the glass repeatedly until the sake shot falls into the beer. Feel free to yell Ichi…ni…san…sake bomb! (which translates to one...two...three...sake bomb!) to get the party started.

If you’re not a huge fan of the sake-beer combo, feel free to tailor the spirit and brew to your liking. Blanco tequila and Corona is always a good choice, as is the Skittle Bomb—a mixture of Red Bull and Cointreau that tastes like liquid candy. Whatever you choose to use, we guarantee it’ll taste better when drunk in this fun, feisty way.

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